Advertising

Unit Plan


TEACHER
Karen Sheppard
Adapted by Mark Rounds
GRADE
11-12
DURATION
5 weeks

California Language Arts Content Standards
Standards Addressed in this Unit
2.0Writing Applications 9/10
2.3 Write expository compositions, including analytical essays and research reports:
  1. Marshal evidence in support of a thesis and related claims, including information on all relevant perspectives.
  2. Convey information and ideas from primary and secondary sources accurately and coherently.
  3. Make distinctions between the relative value and significance of specific data, facts, and ideas.
  4. Include visual aids by employing appropriate technology to organize and record information on charts, maps, and graphs.
  5. Anticipate and address readers' potential misunderstandings, biases, and expectations.
  6. Use technical terms and notations accurately.
2.0 Speaking Applications 9/10
2.2 Deliver expository presentations:
  1. Marshal evidence in support of a thesis and related claims, including information on all relevant perspectives.
  2. Convey information and ideas from primary and secondary sources accurately and coherently.
  3. Make distinctions between the relative value and significance of specific data, facts, and ideas.
  4. Include visual aids by employing appropriate technology to organize and display information on charts, maps, and graphs.
  5. Anticipate and address the listener's potential misunderstandings, biases, and expectations.
  6. Use technical terms and notations accurately.
1.0Writing Strategies (Research and Technology) 11/12
1.6Develop presentations by using clear research questions and creative and critical research strategies
1.7Use systematic strategies to organize and record information
Supporting Standards

Teacher Background Reading

TEACHING AND LEARNING ACTIVITIES

Smiley Select and adapt these learning activities to best meet the needs of your students, and to fit the time available:

Introduction

Research
  1. Class discussion - The class will compile a list of questions to ask about advertising as part of our study. The questions should include what we need to know about the advertising environment and the language features of advertisements. They should help us work out a framework for language analysis of a number of different advertising texts, and help with students' own research.

  2. Research assignment - To find out more about advertising and its language features, students will choose individual research topics. They will be given three weeks in the library, the classroom and at home in which to find answers to their research questions. The librarian will be asked to help and told the research needs of the group in advance.

Going Deeper

These activities can run parallel to the research.
  1. To help understand the extent of advertising, individuals will create a drawing, chart or mindmap or other illustration showing where advertising is found in our environment. After a class discussion, they will combine the results.

  2. Students will collect, for example, background information on advertising as files where possible, using history, social, market and sales research articles from books and texts, articles found on Adbuster, information from Museum of Advertising Icons, Ad Flip: the World's Largest Archive of Classic Print Ads, Consumer Reports Zillions and an audiotape excerpt from a Brian Edwards' interview.

    Jigsaw technique will be used to read and discuss the texts they feel are most useful for general background notes.

  3. Advertising-related vocabulary will be introduced or revised to help with language analysis. Then as they read through text and other information, students could be introduced to vocabulary through vocabulary exercises to help other students learn some identified features.
  4. Students will investigate advertising today and in the past to provide practice in language analysis, and to help answer some of our questions about marketing and about change in advertising by:

Research Presentation

  1. Oral presentations - individuals construct and deliver presentations reporting the results of their research findings back to the class in 10-15 minute presentations, using visual aids. They will include class discussion and learning activities in their sessions.

  2. Write a response to an essay question.

EXTENSION ACTIVITIES:

  1. Create own visuals illustrating some advertising techniques as part of the visual aids for their seminar.

  2. Design own TV/magazine advertisement.

  3. Theatresports style advertising game challenge (e.g., ad 3 ways).

  4. Debate an advertising topic with another class e.g., "That Advertising damages our Society". Other background from the Ad-busters organization.

  5. Play the Ad agency simulation game.

  6. Visit an agency or invite an ex-student working in advertising to speak to class.

ASSESSMENT

Writing

  1. Students will write on one of the essay topics listed:
    1. Explain the issue you set out to explore in your personal research, and give details of your findings, showing their significance for your understanding of the language of advertising.
    2. Drawing on your personal research, discuss ways in which advertisers are inventive in their use of language.

  2. You may want to provide them with Prompt Notes on how to write their essay.

  3. These topics have been used on a previous examination in New Zealand. The readers' comments and observations about the student essays they scored are included and there is also a sample student essay.

  4. Use the Expository Writing Rubric based on the California Content Standards to evaluate the essays.

Research and Oral Language

Use the Presentation Rubric to assess the Advertising Research Presentation Rubric.

Seminar Exemplar

RESOURCES

Electronic

Print

Other