Teaching Strategies

Language Features

feature definition example effect
simile Figure of speech: one thing is said to be like another. He was like a tower of strength during my illness. Can paint a meaningful picture that is easy to remember because two usually different things are being compared.
irony The speaker means the opposite of what she says. My lucky day! I got a speeding ticket. Emphasises the words because they mean the opposite of what you first expect.
direct speech The words of a person quoted in a text. Speech marks show the beginning and end of direct speech. "My lucky day! I got a speeding ticket." Makes the text seem real.
contractions Shortened forms of words often in combination with other words. I'll Can make the text look informal or like speech.
passive voice The subject has an action done to it by an agent who may or may not be named. The farms were going to be flooded. More common in impersonal, formal writing and the writer may use passive verbs to suggest distance, objectivity or formality.
emotive language Shows the feelings and attitudes of the writer. Cats are violent bullies. It is often used in persuasive writing to appeal to the reader's emotions, rather than the mind.
metaphor Figure of speech: one thing is said to be another. He was a tower of strength during my illness. Can paint a meaningful picture that is easy to remember because two usually different things are said to be the same.
technical or scientific terms Words used particularly in describing objects or concepts in scientific or technological reports. The function of the small intestine is to digest and absorb nutrients. Often used to give accurate factual information in scientific reports.
factual descriptive language Words used to give information rather than appeal to the emotions. The red colour of flower petals helps to attract insects for pollination. Instructs the reader and gives an accurate description.
imaginative descriptive language Words that appeal to the emotions rather than to just give information. Grief enters your bones and lives there, because it has no use for flesh, and after a while you feel that you're all bone, hard and desiccated, like a skeleton in a classroom. Evokes an emotional image that appeals to the senses. Stimulates the feelings of the reader.
noun phrases Usually a group of words which expand a central essential element. Cancer of the colon affects large numbers of New Zealanders. Explains terms used with precise detail to give exact information.
colloquial language Language that is casual rather than formal. It is likely to be used by people who know each other well. Give us a hand. It is used in spoken language but may be used in written language to create a feeling of familiarity between the writer and the reader.
personification Non-living objects or abstract things are given human qualities. Night stares through the window. Enriches the text and appeals to the senses.

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